FracTracker Alliance | Off the Rails: Risks of Crude Oil Transportation by Freight in NY State and Beyond

FracTracker Alliance | Off the Rails: Risks of Crude Oil Transportation by Freight in NY State and Beyond.

By Karen Edelstein, NY Program Coordinator, FracTracker Alliance

Since 2011, North Dakota crude oil from the Bakken Shale Play has made its way to refineries on the east coast via freight trains. This means of oil transportation is becoming increasingly common, as plans for pipeline development have been falling short, but demand for more energy development continues to climb (see New York Times, April 12 , 2014). In addition to the Bakken crude, there are also currently proposals under consideration to ship crude by rail  from Alberta’s tar sands region, along these same routes through New York State.

Alarm about the danger of these “bomb trains” came sharply into public focus after the disaster in Lac Mégantic, Québec in July 2013 when a train carrying 72 carloads of the highly volatile Bakken oil derailed, setting off a massive series of explosions that leveled several blocks of the small town, killing 47 people (photo above). The crude from the Bakken is considerably lighter than that of other oil and gas deposits, making it more volatile than the crude that has been traditionally transported by rail.

Quantifying the Risk

As estimated by the National Transportation Safety Board, with deliveries at about 400,000 barrels a day headed to the Atlantic coast, about a 20-25% of this volume passes through the Port of Albany, NY. There were recent approvals for 3 billion gallons to be processed through Albany. The remainder of the crude is delivered to other ports in the US and Canada. Any oil travelling by rail through the Port of Albany would also pass through significant population centers, including Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, NY. Binghamton, NY is also bisected by commercial rail lines.

In the past year, the New York Times, as well as other media, have reported on the threat of disasters similar to what occurred in Québec last summer, as the freight cars pass through Albany. Not only is the oil itself volatile, safety oversight is extremely spotty. According to The Innovation Trail, “… a 2013 report from the Government Accountability Office noted that the Federal Railroad Administration only examines 1-percent of the countries rail road infrastructure.”

RiverKeeper, in their recent report on the topic, notes:

Nationwide, shipping crude oil by rail has jumped six-fold since 2011, according to American Association of Railroads data, and rail shipments from the Bakken region have jumped exponentially since 2009.

This ad-hoc transportation system has repeatedly failed — and spectacularly.

The fires resulting from derailments of Bakken crude oil trains have caused fireballs and have burned so hot that emergency responders often can do nothing but wait—for days—to let the fires burn themselves out.

The Guardian has reported that a legacy of poor regulation and safety failures led to the disaster in Québec, leading to bankruptcy of Montreal, Maine & Atlantic Railways (MMA), and numerous class action suits. Records show that MMA was particularly lax in maintaining their rail cars and providing training for their employees. Meanwhile,  in the US, critics of rail transport of volatile crude oil point to inadequate monitoring systems, training, and, importantly, prepared and available emergency response teams that would be able to respond to explosions or disasters anywhere along the route. The size of a explosion that could occur would easily overwhelm volunteer fire and EMT services in many small towns.

These same trains pass through other major cities in Western and Central New York, including Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, and Utica. Not only are the railroads in proximity to significant population centers, they are also close to scores of K-12 schools, endangering the wellbeing of thousands of children (Table 1). In fact, across New York State, 495 K-12 public schools, or 12% of the total in the state, are within a half-mile of major railways–the standard evacuation distance for accidents involving railcars filled with flammable liquids and gases, as recommended by the US Department of Transportation (DOT) intheir Emergency Response Guidebook. The US DOT also recommends an isolation zone of 1600 meters (1.0 miles) around any railcars filled with those materials if they are on fire.

Schools and Gas Drilling

And Claire Barnett of the Healthy Schools Network joins Jeff Jones to discuss schools and gas drilling Interview at about 38 minutes into the program:

Capitol Pressroom, Feb. 1, 2013 http://www.wcny.org/thecapitolpressroomorg/wp-content/uploads/FEB012013.MP3

Healthyschools.org

Marcellus Shale Gas Development: What Does It Mean for Pennsylvania Schools? — Natural Gas — Penn State Extension

Marcellus Shale Gas Development: What Does It Mean for Pennsylvania Schools? — Natural Gas — Penn State Extension.

Marcellus Shale Gas Development: What Does It Mean for Pennsylvania Schools?

 

Posted: March 18, 2012

 

Latest research brief on challenges and opportunities associated with Marcellus shale development as perceived by educational leaders

 

 

The rapid development of natural gas extraction has profound impacts on many communities.  This new fact sheet looks at local challenges and implications they may have for schools.  Surveys  were sent to  high school principals and directors and Career and Technology Center (CTC) directors within the Marcellus shale region, and interviews with focus groups were held to obtain information.  Four broad areas in which schools may see direct effects as a result of natural gas development were determined:  school demographics, student outcomes and workforce development; effects on local roads and transportation; and broader community services and infrastructure.   A comparison of perceptions of school district leaders in areas with high drilling activity to those in areas with lower drilling activity were examined.
The fact sheet does provide all questions asked on the survey as well as the results separated by respondents in areas with lower drilling activity, areas with higher drilling activity, and CTC respondents. Besides the results, implications for school leaders on each broad area are provided.  The complete fact sheet may be viewed here.

Stuck in the middle | Denton Record Chronicle | News for Denton County, Texas | Local News

Stuck in the middle | Denton Record Chronicle | News for Denton County, Texas | Local News.

Editorial: Questions pile up about drilling safety | recordonline.com

Editorial: Questions pile up about drilling safety | recordonline.com.

Is gas drilling safe for kids? – Times Union

Is gas drilling safe for kids? – Times Union.