Drilling advances prompt escalating fight in Colorado | AspenTimes.com

Drilling advances prompt escalating fight in Colorado | AspenTimes.com.

Environmental groups, locals rally against proposed zoning pre-emption

Environmental groups, locals rally against proposed zoning pre-emption.

Groton Group Focuses on Fracking.

Cortland Standard .net.

January 14, 2012

Groton group focuses on fracking

Groton Resource Awareness Coalition trying to shape local debate

GrotonBob Ellis/staff photographer
Mike Goldstein stands in his backyard in McLean on Wednesday. He is among about a dozen Groton-area residents who have formed Groton Resource Awareness Coalition, which aims to lobby officials in the town and village about the potential hazards posed by hydraulic fracturing. The group gave a presentation to the Groton Town Board on Tuesday and will appear before the Village Board on Monday.

By ANTHONY BORRELLI
Staff Reporter
aborrelli@cortlandstandardnews.net

GROTON — Facts and figures have run the gamut in local gas drilling debates, but the long-term impact remains unclear.
That is what more than a dozen Groton-area residents want their town and village officials to think about in coming months as they attempt to raise awareness of high-volume hydraulic fracturing, known better as hydrofracking.
The residents formed Groton Resource Awareness Coalition in September.
The group’s members have planned public forums, conducted polls and are working with town and village leaders as they pose the question of whether hydrofracking would be good for the community.
Groton town officials are gathering input about the issue. Groton is one of the last Tompkins County municipalities to enter the hydrofracking discussion. Towns like Dryden and Ulysses have already banned it, while Freeville imposed a moratorium, pending further study of the issue.
“What Groton does is going to affect all of downstream,” said Dyan Lombardi, a GRAC member. “Everybody should have a say.”
GRAC has posed a long list of questions for the town of Groton to consider.
Included in the list:
l Anticipated revenues from gas drilling activity?
l Necessary costs from gas drilling, including road maintenance?
l Noise level consideration?
l Will it be limited to areas already zoned for industrial activity?
The Groton Town Board has promised to gather as much information on the issue as possible.
“We want to make an informed decision,” Groton Town Supervisor Glenn Morey said.
GRAC has more than a dozen members, including Michael Goldstein, a Cornell University associate professor of psychology who has researched hydrofracking at length.
Hydrofracking involves injecting millions of gallons of water treated with chemicals deep underground into the Marcellus Shale formation to crack it and extract natural gas. The formation lies under much of Central New York and the Southern Tier.
The original process has existed since the late 1930s. But, Goldstein said, the current method of hydrofracking has only been used within the past decade.
“The long-term effects of this are simply unknown,” he said.
He presented some of his research to the Town Board Tuesday during its regular monthly meeting. The bottom line is that hydrofracking could dramatically change Groton, Goldstein said.
He and other GRAC members urged the town board not to underestimate that hydrofracking could industrialize Groton’s rural landscape. The group hopes Groton’s quality of life goes undisturbed.
If Groton allows hydrofracking, Goldstein calculated the town would see more than 1 million truck trips in the course of a gas drilling operation. Groton’s roads, not designed for that level of traffic, would be overstressed, he said.
“These are going to be long-term issues faced by the town,” Goldstein said.
Sixty-nine percent of land in the town is leased for gas drilling. And only 6 percent of Groton’s residents are doing the leasing, Goldstein said.
“You look at the map and say this is a done deal in Groton, but when you look at the data … you see it’s only a small percentage of the people behind it,” he said.
Groton town officials plan to hear a presentation from a gas company and a geological expert in the coming months, Morey said.
Hydrofracking supporters point to economic benefits, including the jobs drilling would bring to communities and income to leaseholders.
But many residents remain concerned about its overall impact in their community.
“What’s in it for us?” asked Groton resident Mike Morris, also a GRAC member.
GRAC follows the lead of other local hydrofracking groups pitching for more discussion, including Gas Drilling Awareness for Cortland County.
Landowners have formed their own coalitions.
Goldstein and GRAC members plan to give another presentation to the Groton village board on Monday.

Home rule laws aren’t a radical idea » Columns » The Daily Star, Oneonta, NY – otsego county news, delaware county news, oneonta news, oneonta sports

Home rule laws aren’t a radical idea » Columns » The Daily Star, Oneonta, NY – otsego county news, delaware county news, oneonta news, oneonta sports.

Cortland Poll: Do You Support Natural Gas Extraction_graphs -1

Do You Support Natural Gas Extraction_graphs -1.

Fracking Shills for Hire – Energy in Depth

Fracking Shills for Hire – Energy in Depth.

Clarification of Home Rule will help communities preserve our NYS constitutional rights of municipal self government. Without protections, the gas industry just keeps coming at us with their annual 100+ million dollar PR & lobbying budgets.

 

Clarification of Home Rule will help communities preserve our NYS constitutional rights of municipal self government.

Without protections, the gas industry just keeps coming at us with their annual 100+ million dollar PR & lobbying budgets.

 

I hope some points I make in this letter can help a wider audience. My Letter to the Editor was just published in today’s (1/12/12) FREEMAN’S JOURNAL.


John Kosmer
Sustainable Otsego
Otsego County Rep, District 8 (Cooperstown & the Town of Otsego)

They Lie, Cheat, Steal


JOHN KOSMER –  

Otsego County Rep, District 8


During “privilege of the floor” at my first Otsego County Board meeting, open to anyone wishing to speak, I witnessed a food fight over considering a resolution supporting Sen Seward’s Home Rule clarification bill. The pro-gassers offered up red herring and baloney. The anti frackers offered up organic home grown food, yogurt and beer.

The red herring was the claim of “unintended consequences” in other commerce areas, when the bill actually applies solely to mineral extraction. The baloney was that passing it would send the message NYS was “closed to business.” Chip Northrup, a Texas oil man who summers here emailed me countering, “All of the major O&G producing states – notably Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and Colorado are Home Rule states.” Clearly those states are “open for business.”

Anti-frackers offered organic food as a growth industry dependent on clean water. They also offered the job expansions of Chobani and Ommegang, dependent on clean water for beer and uncontaminated grazing fields to provide milk for Yogurt. 

Pro-gassers do not understand that the gas industry is like the T-Rex in Jurassic Park. It eats everything. It eats the good guys. It eats the bad guys. Pro-gassers will not be spared. The gas industry won’t deal with them. Gas companies want leases for next to nothing and simply want enough leased acreage to compulsory integrate the adjoining acreage without paying any sign-on bonuses.

Simply put, the gas industry lies, cheats and steals. It lies like it did in the Traverse City, MI area, where it promised sign-on bonuses per acre to those willing to lease, then walked away after drilling a dry hole without paying a cent. It cheats as a successful class action lawsuit in Virginia demonstrated where they shorted lease holders the full amount of gas royalties they were due. It steals as it does in 5 year leases they signed with landholders that actually have clauses that allow them to keep the mineral rights forever.

Clarification of Home Rule will help communities preserve our NYS constitutional rights of municipal self government. Without protections, the gas industry just keeps coming at us with their annual 100+ million dollar PR & lobbying budgets.

Cortland County Poll on Hydrofracking Supports Local Control

Majority of Cortland County Residents say they do not want hydrofracking in their town and do want their towns to take action to control its use.

Poll Sponsored by Gas Drilling Awareness for Cortland Co. (GDACC) and Moving in Congregations, Acting in Hope (MICAH)

Concludes that Home Rule Legislation is needed to Protect towns right to self determination.

Cover Letter – Cortland County, NY.doc

Summary Results- Cortland County – December 17-18, 2011

Comment on a similar poll by same polling firm

Oldies 101.5 – Local News.New Poll Says 58% of Cortland County Residents are Opposed to Fracking

Home rule issues build over gas drilling | Press & Sun-Bulletin | pressconnects.com

Home rule issues build over gas drilling | Press & Sun-Bulletin | pressconnects.com.

Legal Rights of Local Governments Jan 27, 7pm Norwich

LEGAL RIGHTS of LOCAL GOVERNMENTS:

Home Rule vs. DEC’s Regulatory System  LegalGasForum Draft 1

PANELISTS:
Former Law Professor, Mary Jo Long, is experienced in Constitutional, Administrative, and Municipal Law. Professor Long, an attorney for more than 30 years and an elected member of the Afton Town Board, helped Afton pass its new “Concentrated Heavy Traffic Road Law”
AND
Attorney, Helen Slottje, of Community Environmental Defense Council, works alongside municipalities and community groups seeking legal protection from the threats posed by industrial style gas extraction. In particular, CEDC focuses on sustainable development and the human rights to clean water, clean air and a healthy environment.
NOTE: Please park on the street; in Hayes Street or County Office Building parking lots, NOT in Church parking
7 PM
Thursday,
January 27
United Church of Christ
11 W Main St,
Norwich
Part of The Fourth Thursday Speakers Series sponsored by
C-CARE: Chenango Community Action for Renewable Energy
For more information contact Chris at 334-6095 or Ken at <ccare@frontier.com>