Is Fracking and Answer? to What? by Lindsey Grant

Lindsey Grant fracking-lg  Is Fracking and Answer? to What?  by Lindsey Grant

Hydraulic fracturing (“fracking” in the popular literature; “fracing” in some technical
journals) is a technique for expanding gas and oil production. It is dramatically raising
expectations for future gas and oil production, and technological optimists are hailing it as
the answer to fears of a decline in world fossil energy production. In fact, it is still largely an
unknown, and we cannot say with any confidence how it will affect the future of fossil energy.
If indeed it does contribute substantially to world energy supplies – particularly gas – there
will be profound ramifications, and they are not all benign. If it is simply used to support more
growth, the new supply will support an unsupportable life style for a little longer and then lead
to a deeper collapse. If we recognize the limits to growth, perhaps we can use it to ameliorate
the transition. I shall describe the process briefly, identify some of its strengths and dangers,
and offer a tentative evaluation of its potential impacts on world issues from climate change to
food and the future of human populations.

Gas exports show need for energy policy – Ron Bartizek | The Times Leader, Wilkes-Barre, Scranton PA – Ron Bartizek Column

Gas exports show need for energy policy – Ron Bartizek | The Times Leader, Wilkes-Barre, Scranton PA – Ron Bartizek Column.

Foreign Ownership in Marcellus Shale

The development of unconventional natural gas in the US is NOT by American companies, but it is a joint venture with foreign countries like China, India, Norway, the UK, Japan, and South Korea.


https://spreadsheets.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AttP1cRHZ8J_dGc1SFp4OHlEQ3UtVVl2UDlLYkxxM3c&authkey=CMP4r_QI&hl=en_US#gid=0

In other words, even if we reduce our dependency on foreign oil [which we won’t because oil and gas are not totally interchangeable as a fuel source], we will then become dependent on foreign owned natural gas.
These companies that are drilling in PA and elsewhere in the US are multinational corporations that hold no allegiance to the US, the American people, or the American economy. They only serve their shareholders and their corporate ‘bottom line’, not the interests of the American people. There’s nothing patriotic about them. We will ultimately end up buying American natural gas from foreign entities on the global market and competing with the highest bidder.
When these companies talk about increasing the wealth, they’re talking about their’s and their international shareholders, not your’s, and not America’s.
If we want to achieve true energy independence, and do what’s right for our economy, provide real permanent American jobs, and be truly patriotic, we need, as Americans, to invest in clean, renewable, and sustainable energy sources. Solar, photovoltaic solar, geothermal, wind turbines, hydro-turbines, and bio-methane will provide permanent American jobs in manufacturing, service & installation, and technological research and developement, and move towards eliminating fossil fuels while protecting the environment, public health and safety, and preserve our other natural resources like pure water and clean air for our children and our children’s children.
I ask you… what is more reasonable, more responsible, and more patriotic than that?
Besides, we have the technology, we have the land, we have the wind, and we have the work force. The only thing we don’t have is the political will, and we can change that by speaking up and demanding better representation, and by voting. As I’ve said before, you may not be able to change stupid or greedy, but you can vote it out!
The oil & gas industry has tried to tell us that: hydraulic fracturing is safe for the environment, you will become wealthy by leasing [ie: selling your subsurface real estate] your land, this will move the US toward energy independence, and it’s the patriotic thing to do. All of which has proven to be, at best misleading, if not outright lies.
Pass this on if you agree.
John Trallo

Pipe Dreams | Food & Water Watch

Pipe Dreams | Food & Water Watch.

Pipe Dreams: What the Gas Industry Doesn’t Want you to Know about Fracking and U.S. Energy Independence is available here:

http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/briefs/pipe-dreams/

August 4, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Kate Fried, Food & Water Watch, (202) 683-4905
Eric Weltman, Food & Water Watch, (718) 943-9085

Shaky U.S. Economy Won’t Benefit from Natural Gas Expansion
Food & Water Watch Analysis Reveals Industry Plans to Send Fracked
Gas and Profits Overseas

Washington, D.C.—As the federal government prepares to gut key programs to protect water and other natural resources through this week’s debt agreement, the Department of Energy (DOE) has announced plans to invest $12.4 million on programs to support shale gas development. Yet new analysis released today by the national consumer advocacy group Food & Water Watch casts additional doubt on the benefits of natural gas obtained through hydraulic fracturing. Pipe Dreams: What the Gas Industry Doesn’t Want you to Know about Fracking and U.S. Energy Independence shows that gas leases are not only generating less energy than once forecast, but also a significant portion of U.S. fracked gas will be exported overseas and the industry’s revenues will benefit foreign economies.

According to recent trade publication accounts, DOE will invest $1.6 million, outspending General Electric 4 to 1, on a project designed to remove radioactive material from wastewater from fracking operations in New York State. It will spend additional funds on projects to improve natural gas well performance in Colorado, Texas, California and New Mexico.

In July, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo lifted a moratorium on fracking, and the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation has recommended opening up 85 percent of the Marcellus Shale in New York to gas fracking. A coalition of 49 groups has come out in support of a ban on fracking in New York.

“This new analysis provides further evidence that fracking will endanger New York’s water for the benefit of foreign interests and customers,” said Eric Weltman, Food & Water Watch’s senior organizer in New York. “Governor Cuomo needs to read this report, which effectively undermines the natural gas industry’s claims that fracking will promote energy independence.”

While U.S. natural gas consumption is actually expected to decline through 2015, it is expected to increase overseas—as much as 44 percent by 2035, with China and India leading that demand. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities once conceptualized for importing gas are now being converted to export terminals to feed the Chinese and Indian markets; Chesapeake Energy is exploring selling some of its natural gas to the India-based Cheniere Energy. Included in this plan is a liquefaction plant in the Gulf of Mexico. Natural gas from the U.S. is attractive to foreign markets because it is less expensive than that from Asia.

As U.S. companies sell or lease their own holdings, many international players are increasing their share of the U.S. natural gas market:

•       Reliance Industries (India): In 2010 announced the purchase of a 40 percent stake in Atlas Energy’s Marcellus Shale operation for $1.7 billion; also acquired a 45 percent stake in Eagle Ford shale from Pioneer Natural Resources for $1.36 billion, including $210 million to Pioneer’s other partner Newpek LLC, a subsidiary of Mexican company ALFA SAB de CV.

 

•       China National Offshore Oil Corp (China, government-owned): Agreed to pay $2.2 billion for access to a shale play in south Texas in October 2010; agreed to pay $570 million in cash for a third of Chesapeake’s Niobrara shale basin in Colorado and Wyoming in January 2011.
•       BP (United Kingdom): In 2008, invested more than $3.6 billion in U.S. shale, including $1.9 billion for 25 percent of Chesapeake’s Fayetteville shale operations and $1.75 billion for all of Chesapeake’s Woodford Shale operations in Oklahoma.

 

•       Royal Dutch Shell (Netherlands): Paid $4.7 billion for East Resources and its Marcellus Shale assets in 2010.

 

After rising and falling in 2008, natural gas prices plateaued in 2010 and have remained steady since. Moreover, many gas wells are producing less gas than once expected, and some U.S.-based companies such as Chesapeake Energy have resorted to selling the land their wells are situated on as a means of generating revenues.

Further adding to doubts of the natural gas industry’s ability to generate ample energy, news surfaced earlier this week that the Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) is investigating the accuracy of the industry’s claims regarding the performance of shale gas wells.

Pipe Dreams: What the Gas Industry Doesn’t Want you to Know about Fracking and U.S. Energy Independence is available here: August 4, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Kate Fried, Food & Water Watch, (202) 683-4905
Eric Weltman, Food & Water Watch, (718) 943-9085

Shaky U.S. Economy Won’t Benefit from Natural Gas Expansion
Food & Water Watch Analysis Reveals Industry Plans to Send Fracked
Gas and Profits Overseas

Washington, D.C.—As the federal government prepares to gut key programs to protect water and other natural resources through this week’s debt agreement, the Department of Energy (DOE) has announced plans to invest $12.4 million on programs to support shale gas development. Yet new analysis released today by the national consumer advocacy group Food & Water Watch casts additional doubt on the benefits of natural gas obtained through hydraulic fracturing. Pipe Dreams: What the Gas Industry Doesn’t Want you to Know about Fracking and U.S. Energy Independence shows that gas leases are not only generating less energy than once forecast, but also a significant portion of U.S. fracked gas will be exported overseas and the industry’s revenues will benefit foreign economies.

According to recent trade publication accounts, DOE will invest $1.6 million, outspending General Electric 4 to 1, on a project designed to remove radioactive material from wastewater from fracking operations in New York State. It will spend additional funds on projects to improve natural gas well performance in Colorado, Texas, California and New Mexico.

In July, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo lifted a moratorium on fracking, and the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation has recommended opening up 85 percent of the Marcellus Shale in New York to gas fracking. A coalition of 49 groups has come out in support of a ban on fracking in New York.

“This new analysis provides further evidence that fracking will endanger New York’s water for the benefit of foreign interests and customers,” said Eric Weltman, Food & Water Watch’s senior organizer in New York. “Governor Cuomo needs to read this report, which effectively undermines the natural gas industry’s claims that fracking will promote energy independence.”

While U.S. natural gas consumption is actually expected to decline through 2015, it is expected to increase overseas—as much as 44 percent by 2035, with China and India leading that demand. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities once conceptualized for importing gas are now being converted to export terminals to feed the Chinese and Indian markets; Chesapeake Energy is exploring selling some of its natural gas to the India-based Cheniere Energy. Included in this plan is a liquefaction plant in the Gulf of Mexico. Natural gas from the U.S. is attractive to foreign markets because it is less expensive than that from Asia.

As U.S. companies sell or lease their own holdings, many international players are increasing their share of the U.S. natural gas market:

•       Reliance Industries (India): In 2010 announced the purchase of a 40 percent stake in Atlas Energy’s Marcellus Shale operation for $1.7 billion; also acquired a 45 percent stake in Eagle Ford shale from Pioneer Natural Resources for $1.36 billion, including $210 million to Pioneer’s other partner Newpek LLC, a subsidiary of Mexican company ALFA SAB de CV.

 

•       China National Offshore Oil Corp (China, government-owned): Agreed to pay $2.2 billion for access to a shale play in south Texas in October 2010; agreed to pay $570 million in cash for a third of Chesapeake’s Niobrara shale basin in Colorado and Wyoming in January 2011.
•       BP (United Kingdom): In 2008, invested more than $3.6 billion in U.S. shale, including $1.9 billion for 25 percent of Chesapeake’s Fayetteville shale operations and $1.75 billion for all of Chesapeake’s Woodford Shale operations in Oklahoma.

 

•       Royal Dutch Shell (Netherlands): Paid $4.7 billion for East Resources and its Marcellus Shale assets in 2010.

 

After rising and falling in 2008, natural gas prices plateaued in 2010 and have remained steady since. Moreover, many gas wells are producing less gas than once expected, and some U.S.-based companies such as Chesapeake Energy have resorted to selling the land their wells are situated on as a means of generating revenues.

Further adding to doubts of the natural gas industry’s ability to generate ample energy, news surfaced earlier this week that the Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) is investigating the accuracy of the industry’s claims regarding the performance of shale gas wells.

Pipe Dreams: What the Gas Industry Doesn’t Want you to Know about Fracking and U.S. Energy Independence is available here: http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/briefs/pipe-dreams/

Food & Water Watch works to ensure the food, water and fish we consume is safe, accessible and sustainable. So we can all enjoy and trust in what we eat and drink, we help people take charge of where their food comes from, keep clean, affordable, public tap water flowing freely to our homes, protect the environmental quality of oceans, force government to do its job protecting citizens, and educate about the importance of keeping shared resources under public control.

###

August 4th, 2011

Pipe Dreams: What the Gas Industry Doesn’t Want you to Know about Fracking and U.S. Energy Independence

Download the PDF File

Energy Tax Policy: Issues in the 111th Congress CRS Report

Energy Tax Policy: Issues in the 111th Congress
Molly F. Sherlock
Analyst in Economics
Donald J. Marples
Section Research Manager
September 20, 2010
Congressional Research Service
7-5700
www.crs.gov
R40999R40999.pdf (application/pdf Object)
.

Chesapeake is selling-off more US assets, this time to the Chinese.

Cnooc Pays $570 Million for Chesapeake Shale Stake – Businessweek.

Cnooc Pays $570 Million for Chesapeake Shale Stake

January 31, 2011, 4:12 PM EST

More From Businessweek

By Jim Polson and John Duce

(Updates share price in eighth paragraph.)

Jan. 31 (Bloomberg) — Cnooc Ltd., China’s largest offshore energy producer, agreed to pay $570 million in cash for a one- third stake in Chesapeake Energy Corp.’s Niobrara shale project, adding to its U.S. holdings in crude oil production.

The Chinese explorer also agreed to pay as much as $697 million, up to two-thirds of Chesapeake’s costs to drill and complete wells in the area, the companies said in a statement yesterday.

The deal follows Chinese President Hu Jintao’s first state visit to the U.S. this month to expand economic ties and would be Cnooc’s second U.S. energy asset purchase from Chesapeake, five years after political opposition derailed its $18.5 billion bid for Unocal Corp. The company will pay about $2,140 an acre for its stake in Niobrara and has the right to a one-third share in future acquisitions in the shale formation.

“If you look at President Hu’s recent trip to Washington, there seems to be a greater willingness in the U.S. to encourage Chinese investment,” said Wang Aochao, head of China energy research at UOB-Kay Hian Ltd. in Shanghai. “We don’t have all the details at hand, but it appears to be a fair price for these assets. The Chinese oil majors still think valuations generally for oil and gas assets are reasonable.”

Niobrara covers 8,400 square miles (21,756 square kilometers) in Colorado and Wyoming and may contain 103.6 million barrels of oil, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated in 2006 before Chesapeake, EOG Resources Inc. and other producers began drilling the formation.

‘Seems Rich’

Cnooc, which is listed in Hong Kong, has risen 54 percent in the past 12 months, outpacing the 16 percent gain in the benchmark Hang Seng Index. The shares fell 0.7 percent to HK$17.20 today. The Hang Seng also declined 0.7 percent.

Chesapeake rose $2.20, or 8.1 percent, to $29.53 at 4:02 p.m. in New York Stock Exchange composite trading, its largest gain in five weeks. Other U.S. oil and gas producers with Niobrara leases also rose, including Petroleum Development Corp. and Andarko Petroleum Corp.

“This price seems rich,” Eric Hagen, an analyst for New York-based Lazard Capital Markets, said in a note today to clients affirming a hold rating on Chesapeake shares. “Cnooc is seeking access to technology more than U.S. assets.”

The Chinese energy explorer forecast a 12 percent increase in oil and gas production in 2011 after spending about $8.4 billion in the past year acquiring assets in the U.S., Africa and Argentina. By contrast, output rose 44 percent in 2010.

Prior Shale Purchase

Cnooc, based in Beijing, completed its $1.08 billion purchase of a one-third interest in Chesapeake’s 600,000 acres in the Eagle Ford project in South Texas in November. The Niobrara deal may be completed in the first quarter of this year, according to yesterday’s statement.

“The win-win deal valuation is fair based on our estimates and Cnooc’s strategy to further expand into the oil-rich shale deposits in the U.S.,” said Gordon Kwan, head of regional energy search at Mirae Asset Securities in Hong Kong. “The total investment of $1.27 billion in the deal through 2014 is manageable and equates to about 14 percent of Cnooc’s budgeted $9 billion for 2011.”

The Niobrara deal will lead to a reduction in U.S. oil imports over time and the creation of thousands of jobs, Aubrey McClendon chief executive officer of Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake, said in the statement.

“This transaction will provide the capital necessary to accelerate drilling of this large domestic oil and natural gas resource,” McClendon added.

Doubling Rigs

Chesapeake expects to double its drilling rigs in Wyoming’s Powder River and Colorado’s Denver-Julesburg basins to 10 by the end of the year. It plans to have 20 rigs working by end-2012.

Chesapeake, the most active U.S. gas and oil driller, has 16 wells producing in those basins with initial output of as much as 1,000 barrels of oil and 3 million cubic feet of natural gas a day, according to the company.

The companies plan to eventually produce the equivalent of as much as 5 billion barrels of oil from the basins.

–Editors: Tina Davis, Jessica Resnick-Ault

To contact the reporters on this story: Jim Polson in New York at jpolson@bloomberg.net; John Duce in Hong Kong at jduce1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Susan Warren at susanwarren@bloomberg.net

Cheniere Energy, In Reversal, Wants to Export Natural Gas – NYTimes.com

Cheniere Energy, In Reversal, Wants to Export Natural Gas – NYTimes.com. Jan. 28, 2011

The central assumption behind the export strategy is simple: American gas prices are destined to be cheaper than European and Asian prices for years to come. At today’s prices, companies would be able to buy American gas at $4.35 per million British thermal units, and then sell the same gas in Europe or Asia for roughly double that price, since long-term contracts globally are still largely tied to high benchmark oil prices.

Related stories from Bendon O’Connor

“Cheniere Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas” (Federal Register)- http://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2010/04/16/2010-8753/cheniere-marketing-llc-application-for-blanket-authorization-to-export-liquefied-natural-gas
“Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC; Application for Long-Term Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas” (Federal Register)- http://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2010/10/12/2010-25546/sabine-pass-liquefaction-llc-application-for-long-term-authorization-to-export-liquefied-natural-gas
“Sempra LNG Marketing, LLC; Application for Blanket Authorization To Export Liquefied Natural Gas” (Federal Register)- http://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2010/09/29/2010-24389/sempra-lng-marketing-llc-application-for-blanket-authorization-to-export-liquefied-natural-gas
“Encana says eyes supplying U.S. natgas for export: “…Encana Corp (ECA.TO), Canada’s biggest natural gas producer, said it is interested in marketing gas produced in the United States for shipment overseas as domestic production increases…Cheniere’s project, which could export up to 16 million tonnes per year of LNG, is one of three proposed LNG export plans in North America as increased production from shale gas and tepid demand push U.S. inventories to record highs. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is currently considering Cheniere’s project.” (Reuters)- http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN1428019620101214 (See also- http://www.google.com/search?q=Cheniere+site:federalregister.gov&num=100&hl=en&safe=off&tbo=1&biw=1216&bih=608&output=search&source=lnt&tbs=qdr:y&sa=X )
“Chesapeake Energy wants to export LNG: “…Mike Stice, senior vice president for natural gas projects at Oklahoma City-based Chesapeake Energy, would like to create new markets for the natural gas that is inundating the US, due in part to dramatically increased production in shale gas plays…Liquefying and exporting shale gas from shale plays like the Haynesville, Barnett, and Eagle Ford to global markets holds major promise as the US confronts an oversupply of cheap supplies, said analyst Rick Smead of Navigant Consulting…” ” ( Oil & Gas Financial Journal via PennEnergy)- http://www.pennenergy.com/index/petroleum/display/6421909998/articles/oil-gas-financial-journal/unconventional/chesapeake-energy.html
“Chinese stake out Chesapeake: “…”The deal reflects the ambition of Chinese companies to enter the global oil and gas industry, especially when China’s gas demand is expected to rise sharply,” said Grace Liu, an energy analyst with Guotai Junan Securities in Shenzhen, China…” ” (Bloomberg News via American Chronicle)- http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/yb/151039348
“Chesapeake CEO outlines “holy grail” for natural gas: “…. He said the U.S. by then could have in place an infrastructure for conversion of natural gas to liquid form, potentially for use as a motor fuel, and for export to foreign countries as liquefied natural gas (LNG)…Widespread use of gas as a motor fuel would boost demand and encourage higher prices for producers of the power plant, heating and industrial fuel…” ” (Texas)- http://blogs.star-telegram.com/barnett_shale/2010/11/chesapeake-ceo-outlines-holy-grail-for-natural-gas.html & http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/11/03/2602454/chesapeake-ceos-quest-cars-running.html
“Firm Would Export U.S. Natural Gas to China: “…But is it about to become a major exporter of one type of domestic fuel? A Houston-based company took a small, tentative step in that direction on Thursday, by saying it was working on a deal to supply liquefied natural gas from Louisiana to one of China’s largest independently owned natural gas companies…” ” (The Wall Street Journal)- http://www.gohaynesvilleshale.com/forum/topics/firm-would-export-us-natural & http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704756804575608864254564960.html
“Macquarie Energy and Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. to Jointly Develop U.S. LNG Export Project: “…The proposed liquefaction facility will be capable of liquefying up to 1.4 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) of natural gas and will create a world-class bi-directional import/export LNG terminal…Worldwide growth in both LNG demand and supply is forecasted to continue, with the rate of demand outpacing supply. The majority of the demand growth is expected to be driven by Asia…Freeport LNG expects to file for an export license with the Department of Energy in December and shortly thereafter start the approval process with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)…” ” (Press Release) (Macquarie)- http://www.macquarie.com/us/about_macquarie/media_centre/20101122.html
“Booming U.S. Gas Industry Becoming an American Energy Exporter: “…At this time of Thanksgiving we can be grateful that a tectonic shift in America’s dependence on imported energy is beginning to take hold. In the last weeks a number of major events have taken place that are beginning to shift the balance of energy in significant ways. Last month the Chinese government owned energy company CNOC (you will recall CNOC’s failed bid to take over Unocal in 2005) committed over a billion dollars to take an important stake in the Eagle Ford, shale gas acreage in Texas. In doing so they joined the Norwegian state oil company, Statoil, that had made an earlier investment in the Eagle Ford field as well. Major oil companies such as Exxon, Shell, Chevron and myriad other foreign entities have joined American gas producers such as Chesapeake Energy to invest tens of billions of dollars these past years to develop a stake in what is becoming a treasure trove of natural gas ranging from Texas and Louisiana to the vast Marcellus field of Western Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and upstate New York…Of particular significance this Monday, Macquarie Energy and Freeport LNG announced plans to jointly develop a $2 billion project to liquefy, market and export 1.4 BCF gas/day. Mr. Nicholas O’Kane, Sr. Managing Director of Macquarie Group (an Australian company) was pointedly quoted, “Recent developments in shale gas technology have transformed the U.S. gas market. The U.S. has developed significant natural gas resources and is able to meet projected domestic demand and a surplus for a long time to come.” …” ” (The Huffington Post)- http://www.huffingtonpost.com/raymond-j-learsy/the-uss-booming-gas-indus_b_787949.html (Raymond J. Learsy- http://www.huffingtonpost.com/raymond-j-learsy# & http://www.wilsoncenter.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=about.profile&person_id=12857 )
“Shale gas popularity rising but experts remain divided: “…Recent energy discoveries are of huge importance because the U.S. used to be an importer and has now become a major exporter, Felix Lutz, a senior energy adviser at the European Parliament, recently told the Daily News…” ” (Hurriyet Daily News and Economic Review)- http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/n.php?n=specialists-question-european-shale-market-2010-11-28
“China and India see what the US doesn’t – the potential of natural gas: “…And that brings me to the next development. Cheniere Energy has signed an agreement with ENN Energy Trading of China, under which ENN will contract 1.5m tonnes per annum of bi-directional Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) processing capacity at Cheniere’s Sabine Pass LNG terminal in the US. This makes the possiblity of the US exporting its gas to the rest of the world that much more likely to happen. As gas is liquified for ease of use during transport…Europeans and Asians have been eagerly snapping up acreage for several years now. Indeed, Cnooc, the Chinese energy company, in October agreed to pay up to $2.16bn to buy a 33.3 per cent interest in Chesapeake’s Eagle Ford shale play in the largest Chinese investment in the US energy sector…” ” (Financial Times)- http://blogs.ft.com/energy-source/2010/11/11/china-india-see-natural-gas-potential-us-government-is-missing/
“China Buys U.S. Assets with its Surplus Dollars: “…CONOOC, China’s national oil company, recently announced an agreement with Chesapeake Energy Corporation that would give the Chinese a 33 percent share in a new drilling project set to start soon in southwest Texas. The deal reportedly will cost CONOOC more than $2 billion and is just one of a string of purchases by the Chinese who recently have gone on an international buying spree. Long known for accumulating a surplus of U.S. dollars as it grew its manufacturing base by exporting products to the American market, our manufacturing trade deficit with China more than tripled from 2000 to 2008, as it went from $83.8 billion to $268 billion. Now, China is using that excess of dollars to purchase hard assets such as oil and gas properties in Texas…” ” (Texas)- http://www.dallasblog.com/201011081007320/tom-pauken/china-buys-u.s.-assets-with-its-surplus-dollars.html
“U.S. sends first gas to NW Europe in 50 years: “…The United States is set to supply gas to Britain for the first time in half a century, with a liquefied natural gas (LNG) tanker expected to arrive from Louisiana in late November…The U.S. started re-exporting LNG to higher-paying markets in Asia and South America earlier this year, but the Maersk Meridian LNG tanker, expected to arrive on November 18 at Britain’s Isle of Grain terminal, is the first to head to Europe — Russia’s main export market…Nearly 20 billion cubic feet of gas has been re-exported from the United States this year, excluding the gas aboard the UK-bound vessel. In mid-October, two cargoes were shipped from the U.S. Gulf by Excelerate Energy, one of which is heading to Kuwait, the other to Argentina…” ” (Reuters) (UK)- http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKTRE6A734Y20101108
“Commentary: U.S. Exports of Coal & Natural Gas: “…Of course, increasing exports also reduces the trade deficit. And thanks to twin dynamics in American attitudes toward energy use and in the rapidly growing global demand for electricity, the U.S. has surprisingly become a significant energy exporter…There’s another area for potential growth — natural gas. Just a few years ago, companies were building terminals along the coast to facilitate the importation of clean- burning liquefied natural gas or LNG. But thanks to huge new discoveries and new drilling techniques, the U.S. now has abundant supplies of its own. In September, the Department of Energy approved the application of one of those import terminals in Sabine Pass, Texas, to convert to an export facility…” ” (Video, PBS Nightly Business Report)- http://www.pbs.org/nbr/site/onair/transcripts/energy_independence_and_elections_101102/
“Shale Gas: Not An Overnight Success: “…”A lot of investment has been made in the US market but there has been a change in plan — like plans to receive LNG, which it now wants to export.”…”Acceptance by local communities is important, especially in Europe, a highly populated area,” said Ito, who mentioned that trucks coming in and out, and the noise they created were a very difficult issue…” ” (Natural Gas for Europe)- http://naturalgasforeurope.com/shale-gas-not-an-overnight-success.htm
“LNG re-exports signal US shale gas impact: “…The US is normally regarded as a hungry energy consumer, but has recently assumed a new role — that of exporter of liquefied natural gas…” ” (Lloyd’s List)- http://www.lloydslist.com/ll/sector/tankers/article351391.ece
“LNG Industry To 2016 – Increasing Gas Supply Challenges Future Growth Prospects: “…This oil and gas report provides forecasts for the liquefaction and regasification sectors of the LNG industry, of planned liquefaction and regasification terminals and of planned major global LNG projects to 2016. The report also provides segmental forecasts of the global LNG market in different regions worldwide and highlights the major countries in the region…” ” (GBI Research)- http://www.companiesandmarkets.com/Summary-Market-Report/lng-industry-to-2016-increasing-gas-supply-challenges-future-growth-prospects-322094.asp
“The (Shale) Gas Renaissance: “…By 2014, Canada will be a major producer and exporter of shale gas. Within just a few years, the U.S. could (and if it has its energy act together, it should) join Canada as a key natural gas exporter…” ” (Energy Tribune)- http://www.energytribune.com/articles.cfm/6174/The-Shale-Gas-Renaissance
“What if the U.S. Became a Net Exporter of Liquefied Natural Gas?: “…So what is the solution? Simple, increase exports of natural gas…Cheniere Partners (CQP) received permission from the US Department of Energy to export LNG produced in North America from its Sabine Pass terminal. The company had already received permission to re-export imported LNG. Cheniere Partners announced a memorandum of understanding was signed with a Chinese company, ENN Energy Trading Co., to provide the company with 1.5 million metric tons annually of LNG produced at Sabine Pass. Additionally, Cheniere Partners signed a memorandum of agreement with Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. The agreement would allow Morgan Stanley to import or export up to 1.7 million metric tons annually from Sabine Pass. Currently, there is one other North American LNG export facility. The US has 10 LNG import terminals where the owners are petitioning the US government for export licenses to join the race to export LNG. We could see the ramp up of export facilities in the near future. This bodes well for the natural gas industry and companies like Chesapeake Energy, Corp. This may be one of the reasons why Carl Icahn recently has taken a 5.8% stake in the company…” ” (Seeking Alpha)- http://seekingalpha.com/article/242898-what-if-the-u-s-became-a-net-exporter-of-liquefied-natural-gas
“Shell: We’ll produce more gas than oil by 2012: “…What about exporting liquefied natural gas? When it comes to the skills and the technology around liquefied natural gas, we’re well-placed if not the best placed company in terms of bringing the solution to that equation. As this market continues to develop, if the right thing is for this resource to leave the continent, we’re in a good place to do that…” ” (Fortune via CNN Money)- http://money.cnn.com/2010/12/15/news/companies/shell-oil-gas-odum.fortune/index.htm?section=money_latest
“North America: The new energy kingdom: “…Mr. Forbes was explaining why CNOOC, China’s principal state-owned oil company, was paying Chesapeake Energy $1.08-billion (U.S.) in cash for a one-third interest in the company’s next shale gas play in Texas — and paying 75 per cent of the cost of developing it. Yes, China was investing in drilling technology: China itself has abundant shale gas reserves. But China had another objective. “Within a decade,” Mr. Forbes said, “the U.S. will be a major natural gas exporter.” And China will be a major importer…” ” (The Globe and Mail) (Canada)- http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/commentary/neil-reynolds/north-america-the-new-energy-kingdom/article1828896/ & http://www.firstenercastfinancial.com/e_commentary.php?cont=100170
“Cheniere Plans to Export U.S. Gas Into Caribbean Power Markets, CEO Says: “…Cheniere owns the Sabine Pass LNG terminal in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The company said in June that the plant might become the first in the continental U.S. to export LNG, citing increased domestic production from unconventional gas and lagging demand. JPMorgan Chase & Co., which is boosting its LNG trading in North America, said in August the country may see more “development plans” for liquefaction facilities if low prices boost export demand…” ” (Bloomberg)- http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2010-12-08/cheniere-plans-to-export-u-s-gas-into-caribbean-power-markets-ceo-says.html
“Another publication discovers U.S. on verge of energy independence without green fuels: “…Toronto’s Globe & Mail quotes a UN report that includes this observation: “Within a decade or so, North America will almost certainly emerge as the world’s biggest supplier — and exporter — of reasonably cheap energy.”…” “(San Francisco Examiner)- http://www.sfexaminer.com/blogs/beltway-confidential/2010/12/another-publication-discovers-us-verge-energy-independence-withou
“With natural gas glut, firms bank on exporting: “…The terminal requires approval from the Energy Department and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission…Demand and prices for liquefied natural gas overseas have remained much higher than in North America, however, leading some U.S. producers to mention exporting it. For example, Chesapeake Energy CEO Aubrey McClendon has suggested exports to boost demand for U.S. natural gas…Freeport plans to seek 20-year contracts for gas exported from the terminal, Smith said. Long-term contracts are needed for financing for the project, he said. Also Monday, Exxon Mobil Corp. said it put on hold plans for a floating liquefied natural gas import terminal off New Jersey, citing changes in its outlook for fuel supply and demand in the region…” ” (Texas)- http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/11/22/2652178/with-natural-gas-glut-firms-bank.html
“Freeport/Macquarie to Build LNG Export Terminal in Texas: “…Macquarie Energy, the North American energy marketing and trading arm of Macquarie Group (Macquarie), and Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P. (Freeport LNG) today announced an agreement to jointly develop and market liquefaction capacity at Freeport LNG’s existing LNG import terminal near Freeport, Texas. The proposed liquefaction facility will be capable of liquefying up to 1.4 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) of natural gas and will create a world-class bi-directional import/export LNG terminal…” ” (LNG World News)- http://www.lngworldnews.com/usa-freeport-macquarie-to-build-lng-export-terminal-in-texas/
“Macquarie, Freeport to build Texas LNG export terminal: “…Liquefied natural gas terminal developer Freeport LNG and Macquarie Bank have agreed to build an export plant in Texas to send US-produced gas overseas, a spokeswoman for Macquarie told Reuters…” ” (Reuters)- http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSL3E6MM00B20101122
“Macquarie in gas tie-up with Freeport LNG: “…The proposal follows a similar move by Cheniere Energy for a combined import and export terminal at Sabine Pass, Louisiana…Projects, such as Freeport and Sabine, could have repercussions for global LNGmarkets. The shale boom has made the country the world’s biggestnatural gas producer, with 57bn cu ft a day of output, according toNikos Tsafos of PFC Energy, the consultancy. If the US exported just a10th of its gas last year, he says, it would have been the world’s topLNG exporter…” “(Stockhouse)- http://www.stockhouse.com/Blogs/ViewDetailedPost.aspx?p=110227
“Project aims to liquefy U.S. natural gas: “…”Asia seems a likely market for U.S. LNG, given current market dynamics and the fact that the Panama Canal is opening soon to LNG tankers, said Nicholas O’Kane, global head of Macquarie Group’s energy markets division in Houston. “But we’ll be marketing in Europe in the next few weeks as well,” O’Kane said. If Freeport and Macquarie are able to sign up customers committed to buying the LNG for up to 20 years, they will use those com- mitments to fund the project through U.S. debt markets…” ” (Texas)- http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/business/energy/7307449.html
“Glut prompts project to chill natural gas for export: “…Freeport LNG is partnering with Australian bank Macquarie to build the capacity to turn U.S. natural gas into a liquid for shipment overseas.The Freeport terminal, which opened on the Texas coast in 2008 to import liquefied natural gas from other countries, has already added the capacity to ship some of that LNG back overseas because of overproduction of the fuel in the U.S…Earlier this month, Cheniere said it also plans to build gas liquefaction capacity to export LNG from its facility in Sabine Pass…” ” (Fuel Fix)- http://fuelfix.com/chronicleenergynews/2010/11/23/glut-prompts-project-to-chill-natural-gas-for-export/
“Bulls rushing into Cheniere Energy: “…Recent trading action suggests a similar trend could now be taking hold in LNG. The stock exploded higher on Nov. 11 after saying it was working on a deal to export natural gas to China…If anything close to that pans out, the United States could become a major exporter of natural gas to places like Western Europe…” ” (Nasdaq)- http://community.nasdaq.com/News/2010-12/bulls-are-rushing-into-cheniere-energy.aspx?storyid=51148
“US to Gain Competitive Edge in Global LNG Market: “…However, current developments indicate that the US is likely to reach the stage of self-sufficiency in coming future. Moreover, the country may achieve a competitive place in the global LNG export market…” ” (SBWire)- http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/sbwire-71565.htm
“The Outlook For LNG: “…The US was never much into exporting LNG because it has plenty of domestic demand for gas. But with the rapid development of the burgeoning US shale gas industry, the US is now looking to becoming an LNG export player. Will it stick to its own side of the fence? Well that remains to be seen…” ” (Australia)- http://www.fnarena.com/index2.cfm?type=dsp_newsitem&n=0CA6A32B-A383-895B-50BD1AD5D9797FB8
“Shale industry delivers message to chambers of commerce: “…The rocks below Western Pennsylvania have enough natural gas in them to fuel the entire Eastern Seaboard for 50 years or more, and with our country’s current dependence on foreign oil, the ability to supply and export our own fuel would benefit the nation. That was the message delivered by representatives of the burgeoning Marcellus Shale extraction industry to guests of an economic forecast breakfast sponsored by The CHAMBER Inc., what used to be the Cranberry and North Hills Area chambers of commerce. The session, touted as the first in a series, was held at Treesdale Country Club last month. In addition to industry representatives, a sizable group of business owners also heard from Bruce Betty, McCandless land use administrator…” ” (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) (PA)- http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10336/1107458-54.stm
“Profit From the Russian Gas Crisis No One’s Covering: “…I have already discussed the likelihood that the accelerating production volume in US shale gas will end up allowing the export of LNG, especially from the Cove Point, Maryland, terminal (the largest LNG facility on the East Coast), and especially to Europe (see “A Solution for North America’s Natural Gas Surplus” from November 2nd). Given the virtual certainty the shale gas (and, to a lesser extent, unconventional production from coal bed methane) will result in a continuing surplus on the American market, an LNG outlet to Europe and elsewhere allows for increasing production profits on one side of the Atlantic from LNG sales on the other. This is going to allow investors to “play” the rising differential between LNG and piped gas in the European market by investing in US and Canadian shale gas producers…” ” (Kent Moors)- http://seekingalpha.com/article/239098-profit-from-the-russian-gas-crisis-no-ones-covering & http://oilandenergyinvestor.com/2010/11/profit-from-the-russian-gas-crisis-no-ones-covering/
“US to Gain Competitive Edge in Global LNG Market: “…However, current developments indicate that the US is likely to reach the stage of self-sufficiency in coming future. Moreover, the country may achieve a competitive place in the global LNG export market…” ” (RNCOS)- http://pr-usa.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=578085&Itemid=32
“”U.S. Natural Gas Supply: “…The U.S. natural gas resource should continue to expand in the coming years…Advanced Resources International, in a report commissioned for Cheniere’s application with the Department of Energy for LNG export authorization, estimates that the U.S. has 2,585 Tcf of technically recoverable gas reserves, or 113 years of U.S. demand at 2009 levels…” ” (Cheniere Energy Inc.: “North America’s LNG Gateway”)- http://www.cheniere.com/lng_industry/us_natural_gas_supply.shtml
“Beach pursues boutique LNG project: “…The abundance of shale gas reserves has driven US gas prices down sharply and fuelled interest in the US becoming an LNG exporter. Two LNG export projects for the US have been announced this year, the latest a $US2 billion proposal involving Freeport and Macquarie. The projects represent competition for Australian LNG suppliers in Asian markets…” ” (Australia)- http://www.smh.com.au/business/beach-pursues-boutique-lng-project-20101125-1893c.html
“Think the unthinkable: Gas glut could make the U.S. an LNG exporter: “…These factors are setting up what was an unthinkable scenario just a few years ago – that the U.S. might become a net exporter of natural gas. There are some signs of that change in the works…” ” (Fuel Fix)- http://fuelfix.com/energywatch/2010/11/10/think-the-unthinkable-gas-glut-could-make-the-u-s-an-lng-exporter/
“Natural Gas Rebound Looking Likely in 2011: “…Analysts argue that the natural gas oversupply in the United States could make the nation a major natural gas exporter in upcoming years. Demand for gas is soaring in Asia and other emerging markets as their economies expand. More liquefied natural gas export facilities could be developed going forward. The Wall Street Journal reported that a subsidiary of Cheniere Energy is working on a deal to supply liquefied natural gas to one of China’s largest independently owned natural gas companies. Chesapeake Energy’s Chief Executive Aubrey McClendon told investors at a conference he has been in talks with Cheniere to supply gas to the proposed facility. While Cheniere would still need to build the liquefaction facility, the company’s CEO believes that interest in the project from natural gas suppliers such as Chesapeake, as well as Chinese interest “confirms the global appetite for US natural gas.”…” ” (CNN Money)- http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/marketwire/0704136.htm
“China’s Relentless Hunt for Energy: “…To meet that demand, China’s biggest energy companies have gone on a buying spree. Last year was a record year for China’s oil and gas acquisitions, with $24.3 billion in deals, up from $17.1 billion in 2009…Given that three-quarters of the world’s exploration and production companies are headquartered in North America, the Chinese are likely to bid for U.S. companies, bankers said. “All the Chinese majors will be in North America in the next two years,” O’Malley said…Yet in 2010, Cnooc acquired oil-and-gas assets in the Eagle Ford Shale project in South Texas for $1.1 billion…” ” (The Wall Street Journal)- http://blogs.wsj.com/deals/2011/01/03/chinas-relentless-hunt-for-energy/