TCCoG_Community_Impact_Assessment_12-15-11 Final.pdf (application/pdf Object)

TCCoG_Community_Impact_Assessment_12-15-11 Final.pdf (application/pdf Object).

NY1 Online: Inside City Hall Debates Hydrofracking – NY1.com

NY1 Online: Inside City Hall Debates Hydrofracking – NY1.com.

NY1 VIDEO: Inside City Hall’s Errol Louis discusses the issue of hydrofracking in New York with two supporters of the drilling—Arthur “Jerry” Kremer, a former state assemblyman who is with the New York Affordable Reliable Electricity Alliance, and Ross Pepe, president of the Construction Industry Council and Building Contractors Association—and two opponents: ecologist and author Sandra Steingraber and economist Jannette Barth of J.M. Barth and Associates.

Fracking: Bane or boon? A look into industry’s presence in Pa. | Democrat and Chronicle | democratandchronicle.com

Fracking: Bane or boon? A look into industry’s presence in Pa. | Democrat and Chronicle | democratandchronicle.com.

“Shale Gas: A Renaissance in U.S. Manufacturing

shale-gas.pdf (application/pdf Object).

“Shale Gas: A Renaissance in U.S. Manufacturing,” is based on a high level of shale gas production. The jobs would be created by companies expanding or building new plants, as well as companies bringing manufacturing jobs back to the United States, said Robert McCutcheon, U.S. industrial products leader for PricewaterhouseCoopers LLC, which produced the report with the manufacturer’s association.

Revenue from drilling income taxes is lower | Press & Sun-Bulletin | pressconnects.com

Revenue from drilling income taxes is lower | Press & Sun-Bulletin | pressconnects.com.

Study indicates economic benefits from Marcellus Shale, but questions remain — Natural Gas — Penn State Extension

Study indicates economic benefits from Marcellus Shale, but questions remain — Natural Gas — Penn State Extension.

Exposing the Oil and Gas Industry’s False Jobs Promise for Shale Gas Development: How Methodological Flaws Grossly Exaggerate Jobs Projections | Food & Water Watch

Exposing the Oil and Gas Industry’s False Jobs Promise for Shale Gas Development: How Methodological Flaws Grossly Exaggerate Jobs Projections | Food & Water Watch.

November 15th, 2011

Exposing the Oil and Gas Industry’s False Jobs Promise for Shale Gas Development: How Methodological Flaws Grossly Exaggerate Jobs Projections

Exposing the Oil and Gas Industry's False Jobs Promise for Shale Gas EmploymentThe oil and gas industry, industry-funded academics and ideological think tanks have promoted shale gas development — through the controversial process of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking — as a sure-fire job creator during difficult economic times. Food & Water Watch closely examined a recent report touting the job-creation potential of shale gas development and found numerous inaccuracies and methodological flaws. Even after correcting for these problems, questions remain about the validity of using economic forecasting models to predict the economic impacts of expanded shale gas development.

Read the full report.

Read the issue brief.

The purported economic benefits of shale gas development have served as a primary justification for opening up large parts of New York State to fracking. In a 2011 report, the Public Policy Institute of New York State (PPINYS) claimed that, by 2018, the development of 500 new shale gas wells each year in the five counties of Allegany, Broome, Chemung, Steuben and Tioga could sustain 62,620 new jobs in New York, relative to the case of no shale gas development. Another 500 new wells would need to be drilled and fracked every year to sustain these jobs.

Of these 62,620 jobs, PPINYS claimed that 15,500 would be “direct jobs” created from direct spending by shale gas companies. Only a small fraction of the direct jobs would actually be in the gas industry; most would be direct jobs in different industries due to shale gas company spending. The remaining 47,120 jobs would be “indirect jobs” and “induced jobs” created through the economic spillover effects from direct job creation; that is, through a multiplier effect.

However, after identifying and correcting the numerous inaccuracies and methodological flaws that led to this rosy projection, Food & Water Watch determined that the economic forecasting model PPINYS relied on only supports a claim of 6,656 New York jobs by 2018, under the PPINYS scenario of drilling and fracking 500 new shale gas wells that year. Yet this corrected estimate — a little over one-tenth of the original PPINYS claim — still does not account for any of the negative impacts that shale gas development would have on other economic sectors, such as agriculture and tourism.

The Capitol Pressroom for October 27, 2011 | WCNY Blogs

The Capitol Pressroom for October 27, 2011 | WCNY Blogs.

Martha Robertson, Chair of the Tompkins County Legislature & Doug Barton, Director of Economic Development and Planning for Tioga County are both members of the Southern Tier Regional Economic Development Council, which recently issued a statement on hydrofracking. We will discuss gas drilling with them, as well as where the Southern Tier’s focus may be in the competition to win funding from the state.

Meet cash deadline or the drillers move in

Meet cash deadline or the drillers move in.

Drilling and the DEC: Responding to Economic Impacts

*Drilling and the DEC: Responding to Economic Impacts*
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*Saturday, October 15, 2011** Ithaca, NY*
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About 300 people came to hear grassroots activists, experts, and local officials concerned about protecting our local agriculture and tourism economies, community character, roads and infrastructure The presenters offered information on the revised Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement (SGEIS).****Speakers addressed the portion of proposed drilling guidelines that intends to mitigate adverse social and economic impacts such as truck traffic, threats to food crops, and demand on local services. The forum was moderated by Martha Robertson, Chair of the Tompkins County Legislature. Panelists included Ed Marx, Tompkins County Commissioner of Planning, who addressed the impacts of drilling on local communities. Jannette Barth, Ph.D., Economist, Pepacton Institute, who addressed the flaws in the new socioeconomic impact study. Barbara Lifton, NY State Assemblywoman for Tompkins and Cortland Counties, who addressed what she and other legislators are doing about the shale gas impacts. James (Chip) Northrup, Partner and investor in oil and gas projects, served on Governor of Texas’ Energy Advisory Council, who addressed how to make responses to the DEC. *
*Papers available at http://tinyurl.com/ithaca-sgeis*
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*Video Shot By Cris McConkey available at **http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6FD26CFB7DAB7D2D*
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*Edward Marx <http://www.tcgasmap.org/media/Marx%20Slides%2010-15-11.pdf>
/AICP, Tompkins County Commissioner of Planning and Community Sustainability. His presentation focused on cumulative impacts (and the lack of adequate treatment of them in the revised draft SGEIS) and impacts of gas drilling on local governments./*

*Jannette Barth <http://www.tcgasmap.org/media/Barth%20Slides%2010-15-11.pdf

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/Economist with Pepacton Institute, an economic research and consulting firm. She has worked in the fields of economic analysis and econometric modeling and forecasting for over 35 years. Her presentation discussed what is missing and what is wrong in the economic analysis included in the socio-economic impact section of the revised draft SGEIS./*

*Barbara Lifton <http://www.tcgasmap.org/media/Lifton%20Slides%2010-15-11.pdf>
/NY State Assemblywoman for the 125th District. Ms. Lifton drafted and is sponsor of Assembly Bill 3245 that clarifies that municipal governments have authority to control whether and where resource extraction can take place in their jurisdictions. Ms. Lifton discussed differences between the Assembly bill and the Senate bill drafted by Sen. Seward and the prospects for legislative action in the next session (in the current year the State Senate has refused to take up any gas drilling bills)./*

*James (Chip) Northrup <http://www.tcgasmap.org/media/Northrup%20Slides%2010-15-11.pdf>
/Former planning manager at Atlantic Richfield and an independent oil and gas investor for over 30 years; Mr. Northrup has served on the Governor of Texas’ Energy Advisory Council. His presentation debunked various myths: that New York’s regulations are stronger than in any other state, that the SGEIS is scientifically based (its politically based), and the overestimates of gas resources and economic impacts. Includes instructions on how to comment on the SGEIS and contains links to information and templates that make commenting easier.
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