EPA Tells It Like It Is on HR 2018–the Dirty Water Bill | David Beckman’s Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC

EPA Tells It Like It Is on HR 2018–the Dirty Water Bill | David Beckman’s Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC.

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David Beckman, Senior Attorney & Director, Water Program, Los Angeles

David Beckman

In 1984, I left the cold Philly suburbs for college at U.C. Berkeley, and I have been in California ever since, save three years during law school. I spent three years at a big law firm before coming to NRDC, where I hoped I could combine legal practice with a subject I cared about, the environment. NRDC has enabled me to do that, and I have been here for nearly 14 years. NRDC just launched a new national water program, that integrates our advocacy efforts across the country. The focus of our work is ensuring safe and sufficient water for people and ecosystems. Water is one of the major environmental issues of the 21st Century—a natural resource that is in short supply in many regions and is likely to become even more scarce as population grows and climate changes. There’s a lot to do, and I am going to be focused on how we can make the biggest contribution to ensuring the water we have is clean and we use it as efficiently as we can.

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EPA Tells It Like It Is on HR 2018–the Dirty Water Bill

Posted June 23, 2011 by David Beckman in Curbing Pollution

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A number of my NRDC Water Program colleagues are blogging on HR 2018, reflecting its status as one of the worst dirty water bills any of us have seen.  NRDC’s Founding Director John Adams has now weighed in with a beautiful…continued

EPA Tells It Like It Is on HR 2018–the Dirty Water Bill

David BeckmanPosted June 23, 2011 in Curbing Pollution

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A number of my NRDC Water Program colleagues are blogging on HR 2018, reflecting its status as one of the worst dirty water bills any of us have seen.  NRDC’s Founding Director John Adams has now weighed in with a beautiful piece that underscores how nonsensical and destructive 2018 would be if passed.

The bill blasted out of the House Transportation & Infrastructure committee in record time yesterday, with no hearing. Even if you support repealing foundational elements of our nation’s clean water law, doing so without airing the issues is an indefensible process.  But trying to speed the bill along while folks are on summer vacation (many enjoying waters protected by the very Clean Water Act provisions the bill would gut) is, of course, the plan.

Now, the US EPA, in response to a request from Representative Tim Bishop of New York, has confirmed the analysis of many environmental advocates and others about the bill.  EPA, like many government agencies, doesn’t always use the most direct language in letters to members of Congress. But this is a destructive enough bill that EPA has quickly and commendably found a strong voice.  EPA’s words speak for themselves:

The first line of EPA’s “Technical Assessment H.R. 2018” gets right to the point:  “The bill would overturn almost 40 years of federal legislation by preventing EPA from protecting public health and water quality.”

EPA here is not overstating.  HR 2018, as EPA’s analysis notes, prevents EPA from assuring that upstream states don’t lower standards in a way that passes pollution to their downstream neighbors—a classic problem the Clean Water Act was designed in part to address.  And it prevents EPA from responding to the best science to improve water quality standards as we learn more about the impacts of pollution.

This is like preventing your doctor from updating a course of treatment based on new medical discoveries. It makes no sense.

But the perniciousness of 2018 means that even this isn’t the full story.  EPA then lists its other impacts, and you quickly get the sense that this bill is irredeemable:

  • “The bill would prevent EPA from providing its views on whether a proposed project that pollutes or even destroys lakes, streams, or wetlands would violate CWA standards.”
  • “The bill would remove EPA’s existing state coordination role and eliminate the careful Federal/State balance established in the current CWA.”
  • “The bill would prevent EPA from protecting communities from unacceptable adverse impacts to their water supplies and the environment caused by Federal permits.”
  • “The bill would substantively eliminate the opportunity for EPA, the federal government’s expert on water quality, to comment on Federal permits impacting water quality and public health.

HR 2018 is, at least in part, a direct reaction to positive actions the administration has taken to protect water quality—vetoing a particularly destructive mountain-top mining proposal; upgrading water quality standards in Florida; and proposing stronger action to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, to name three.

It is intended, at minimum, as a message:  EPA, watch out, if you use your authority, we will take it away.  Now that HR 2018 has been turned loose in Congress, we all need to send an equally clear message that we won’t stand for these sort of attacks on the nation’s bedrock water quality statute.

Time to Stop Attacks on the Clean Water Act and Protect Americans’ Top Environmental Priority

Posted June 21, 2011 by David Beckman in Curbing Pollution, U.S. Law and Policy

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To quote Yogi Berra, “It’s déjà vu all over again.”  After spending much of the spring attacking the Clean Air Act, several lawmakers in the House have now set their sights on the Clean Water Act.  This latest onslaught puts…continued

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