MarcellusGas.Org Home Page

MarcellusGas.Org Home Page.

Information Related to Pennsylvania Deep Gas Well Activity
Home
How To Use This Site
Wells » Well Data Reports
Wells » Drilling Maps
Wells » Well Packet Information
Wells » Frac Fluid Composition Reports
Graphs and Statistics
  - by State
  - by County
  - by Township
Impact Fee Revenue Calculator
Record Setting Wells
Record Setting Gas Companies
State Maps
Gas Company Information
Waste Facility Information
FREE Guest Membership
Full Membership Sign Up
Membership Benefits
Your Account Information
Contact MarcellusGas.Org
About MarcellusGas.Org
Related Sites & Links
Privacy Policy
Terms Of Use

The Trillion-Gallon Loophole: Lax Rules for Drillers that Inject Pollutants Into the Earth – ProPublica

The Trillion-Gallon Loophole: Lax Rules for Drillers that Inject Pollutants Into the Earth – ProPublica.

Injection Wells: The Poison Beneath Us – ProPublica

Injection Wells: The Poison Beneath Us – ProPublica.

Poisoning the Well: How the Feds Let Industry Pollute the Nation’s Underground Water Supply – ProPublica

Poisoning the Well: How the Feds Let Industry Pollute the Nation’s Underground Water Supply – ProPublica.

PA DEP Oil & Gas Reporting Website – Statewide Data Downloads By Reporting Period

PA DEP Oil & Gas Reporting Website – Statewide Data Downloads By Reporting Period.

This database shows that much PA unconventional drilling waste is coming to NY for disposal

Spreadsheet showing waste transported to NY from PA Chesapeake wells from Jan to June, 2012.  Most is drill cuttings deposited in Painted Post and Niagara Falls landfills.

NYwaste repositories.1-6of2012.Chesapeake

The Trillion-Gallon Loophole: Lax Rules for Drillers that Inject Pollutants Into the Earth – ProPublica

The Trillion-Gallon Loophole: Lax Rules for Drillers that Inject Pollutants Into the Earth – ProPublica.

Meeting Minard

Meeting Minard.

The Minard Run Oil Company, based in Bradford, Pennsylvania, claims to be the oldest family-owned and -operated independent oil producer in the United States. Founded in 1875 by Pennsylvania Senator Lewis Emery, Jr., the company today is run by four of his great-grandchildren and one of his great-great-grandchildren.

In mid-March, Minard purchased 415 natural gas wells in the Finger Lakes from Chesapeake Energy, the nation’s second-largest producer of natural gas—at least for now. Chesapeake, formed in 1989, enjoys none of Minard’s stability: The company has been beleaguered by criticism of its corporate governance, the shenanigans of CEO Aubrey MacLendon (thoroughly documented by Jeff Goodell in Rolling Stone), and a business plan that has left it severely short of cash—perhaps $10 billion short this year alone. The company’s stock price has fallen 50 percent in the last year. How bad is the company’s management? This week, New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, who heads that state’s pension fund, recommended that Chesapeake’s stockholders refuse to renew the terms of two incumbent board members, saying it was a “necessary first step toward reconstituting a board that is currently entrenched and unaccountable to shareholders.” Corporate raider Carl Icahn, who is circling around the company, has indicated that he thinks the company’s problems are largely the result of poor management at the top.

The sale of Chesapeake’s New York assets to Minard is no doubt part of an effort to meet the cash shortfall. Minard’s new real estate interests, meantime, have augmented the company’s interest in the future of gas well drilling in New York State, especially the future of horizontal, deep-well, hydraulic fracturing, which is the subject of a state review.

Which may help to explain why, in the first week in May, James J. Macfarlane, Minard’s vice president for exploration, acquisitions, and operations, met with Republican State Senator Mark Grisanti in Buffalo’s Donovan State Office Building. Also in the meeting were Brad Gill, executive director of the Independent Oil and Gas Association on New York, or IOGA; Stephen W. Rhoads, manager of state government relations, Appalachia Region, for Shell Energy; and Daniel M. Krainin, an attorney in the New York office of the law firm Beveridge & Diamond, which specializes in environmental and land use law. Macfarlane and Rhoads are both board members of IOGA.

Grisanti, who is chair of the Senate’s Environmental Conservation Committee, has been in a crucible of pressure from both industry-funded proponents of horizontal fracking and environmental activists opposed to the practice. So far, he has declined to take a public position on whether the state ought to permit fracking, preferring to wait until the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation completes its review of the permitting and regulatory scheme it released last year.

 

COMMENT:

Concern: Minard Run now owns one of the state’s three injection disposal wells.
minardrunoil.com  They own fifteen thousand acres of lease holdings in the Marcellus in Bradford County.
We’d better pay attention here.  Minard Run, in their acquisitions  in Cayuga and Onondaga County in March, picked up the injection disposal well near Cayuga Lake not far from Montezuma Wildlife Refuge, name of well on DEC database Quill 672.  
Many  of the wells Minard picked up from CHK were old (1980s) Queenston sandstone wells, lots in Cayuga County.
In Ohio, many of the injection wells are older sandstone wells which were subsequently permitted to flip to injection disposal wells. 

There is no mandated public hearing when the EPA permits an injection well in NY.  (EPA has oversight, NY one of ten states that has not requested primacy for oversight.)   EPA does have to post on their website for thirty days any pending permits – and IF they consider there is sufficient public interest, they MAY issue a press release which the municipality MAY choose to publish.    

John Holko, of Lenape,  who owns another of the injection wells southeast of Rochester, was at the Auburn City Council meeting when they rescinded the ban on taking waste at the municipal treatment plant.  He was also quoted in the NYTimes as saying the infrastructure on waste will be developed as it goes in NY.    His injection well, named Ranous on the DEC site, drilled and permitted for injection in 1985, is 640′ deep.  No zero missing there.  Ranous well is the only one of the three wells exempt from mandated biannual certified sampling of injectate and exempt from nearby ground water monitoring wells required at the two other injection wells.  Interesting as it is the most shallow, the other two wells being 1080′ and 1800′ deep,  shallow still in relation to the injection wells in OH and TX which are several thousand feet deep.

Something to watch, Minard now owning that injection well, they having Marcellus holdings. Waste being a wildcard.  

Mary M


Deep concern: Environmentalists question groundwater risks » Local News » The Tribune Democrat, Johnstown, PA

Deep concern: Environmentalists question groundwater risks » Local News » The Tribune Democrat, Johnstown, PA.

Are injection wells an issue in NY as well? 

Sorta under the radar here as well -
from DEC site - Brine Disposal Well Summary -
first 3 are the active disposal wells, others for storage
- click on link,  then click on searchable database and hit view map for location-
I am in process today of drafting inquiry letter for reports mandated by EPA – got very vague answers last year from Linda Collart  on Quill disposal well 1800′ deep 3/4 mile from Cayuga Lake -
 “No “drilling waste” taken, migration impossible, pressure is very low, biggest problem is truck traffic.”
Yet there are two large tanks labeled PRODUCED WATER/BRINE  near that well - wouldn’t that be drilling waste?
I think one of the biggest problems is the fuzzy words thrown around by agencies - vague by design – won’t find a lot of these in glossaries of EPA nor DEC -
Brine
Formation water – naturally occurring but ‘brine’ used interchangably -
Salt  Water (TX RR commission - really.   http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/about/faqs/saltwaterwells.php
Waste Water
Frack Waste
Drilling Waste
Flowback Fluid
NG liquids
Produced Water – GAO report from Jan. 2012 -  http://www.gao.gov/assets/590/587522.pdf
synonyms all?    keep coming back to that conclusion -
 Quill disposal well town of Cayuga -
Just what and how much is going down there?
Will more Queenston wells be flipped for disposal?  There are scores  dotting Cayuga County.  Is there a public notification process for this?
Agencies make a big deal of inspections for casing standards and integrity of disposal wells - just how do construction standards of these wells really matter?  the concrete and steel WILL eventually fail.  And when the fluids are being injected into a porous layer?  nothing is containing them but the geology…(faults? fractures?  abandoned wells? )   hard to figure how these make sense at a mere 640′, 1080′  and 1800  feet deep.
If anyone knows anything please share.  Will post my query to the agencies when I finish later.  I’ve got a lot of questions.
MaryM
YouTube – Videos from this email

ENERGY-WATER NEXUS Information on the Quantity, Quality, and Management of Water Produced during Oil and Gas Production

ENERGY-WATER NEXUS
Information on the Quantity, Quality, and Management of Water Produced during Oil and Gas ProductionGovernment Accountability Office, Jan 2012.

 

587522.pdf (application/pdf Object).

Ohio Tries to Escape Fate as a Dumping Ground for Fracking Fluid

Ohio Tries to Escape Fate as a Dumping Ground for Fracking Fluid.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 114 other followers